Election 2017: May refuses to rule out income tax rise after Fallon pledge – politics live | Politics


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Good morning and welcome to our live coverage of the final Saturday of the general election campaign. The parties have released some of the big guns for a series of media appearances in a last-ditch attempt to win over voters.

Discussions continue over the events of last night, when Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn appeared on a special edition of BBC Question Time to answer audience questions and put forward their case for being elected to Downing Street. Both faced a string of hostile questions on everything from taxation to foreign policy.

May, under pressure after refusing to turn up for a TV debate earlier in the week, was animated at first and rejected an accusation that she had performed a U-turn by calling a snap general election. But the prime minister came under sustained pressure over the Conservative party’s record on public sector pay, mental health services and social care. The standout moment was when a nurse, Victoria Davey, confronted her over the 1% pay increase received by NHS staff, to which May responded: “I’m being honest with you saying we will put more money in, but there isn’t a magic money tree that we can shake to get everything we want.”

Another woman from the audience became emotional as she described emerging from a fitness-for-work test in tears after being asked about her suicide attempts.

Corbyn’s most uncomfortable moment was when he was questioned repeatedly over defence and security. Pressed over his willingness to push the nuclear button in the face of imminent threat, the Labour leader insisted that “the idea of anyone ever using a nuclear weapon anywhere in the world is utterly appalling and terrible”. Asked again if there were any circumstances in which he would use such a weapon, Corbyn said his party had committed to renew Trident.

The comments led to a heated exchange, with an exasperated member of the audience asking if Corbyn would not even fire back if attacked. He finally received support from one woman in the audience who said she could not understand why others wanted to kill millions of people by discharging a nuclear weapon.

You can read our full report of the debate below.

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