ITV Leaders’ Debate: What did the voters think?


On Thursday night leaders of five political parties took part in an ITV live debate.

Taking part in the two-hour show broadcast from Salford were Liberal Democrats leader Tim Farron, Ukip’s Paul Nuttall, the SNP’s Nicola Sturgeon, Plaid Cymru’s Leanne Wood and Green co-leader Caroline Lucas.

ITV News asked ten voters from across the UK with a mixture of political opinions to give their feedback.

When asked what they thought of Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn refusing to take part in the debate, many said they were in the wrong with one voter saying Theresa May’s decision was about control.

“She’s done it so she can control the situation, so she doesn’t have any bad press whatsoever apart from not turning up,” said one voter.

Despite a mixture of pro and anti-Brexit opinions on the sofa there was no appetite for another referendum. When ITV News asked if anyone would vote Lib Dem as they are offering a second referendum, nine said no with just one saying he would like another chance to vote remain.

When Ukip’s Paul Nuttall said immigration was too high voters in support of Brexit did not disagree.

“I think we’ve got too many immigrants coming into the country and the services just can’t cope with it,” she said.

Of the ten people present there was little support for Theresa May’s grammar school plan under which she proposes to invest £320 million to create a new generation of the schools.

However not one of the participants said they agreed grammar schools were a good idea.

There was a lot of anger from the group with Theresa May’s policy to remove free school meals from primary schools.

“It smacks of Maggie Thatcher the milk-snatcher,” said one voter, with reference to the removal of free school milk for children in the 1980s.

How did the debate help the voters to decide who they would vote for in three weeks time?

Overall there was a mixed response as expected with one voter saying that she thinks many of the policies that people would usually focus on more clearly are being side-lined as Brexit dominates.

Source