Political parties should see themselves as opponents not enemies


Associate Professor of Public Law at UCT Richard Calland says when parties come together to form a coalition it has the potential of creating stability.

Speaking to Bongani Bingwa on the Political Desk, Calland says a coalition represents a broader church of voters.

He says the problem comes, when the parties disagree.

However, when they fall out it’s very messy. It can create instability in government and it can cause harm to the service delivery to the people.

Richard Calland, Associate Professor of Public Law at UCT

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Calland further says, while South Africa has had a number of coalitions in the past twenty years, we are relatively inexperienced in this type of governance.

One of the key things in coalition politics, in general, is that political parties that are contesting power should regard each other as opponents and not enemies.

Richard Calland, Associate Professor of Public Law at UCT

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