‘Turn your back on corruption’


ANC Treasurer Mkhize tells SA students: 'Turn your back on corruption'
Zweli Mkhize, seen as a potential candidate to replace President Jacob Zuma as African National Congress head at a party conference in December, gestures as he speaks to students at the University of South Africa (UNISA) in Roodeport, South Africa October 4, 2017.

Image Credits: REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

We’ll let you figure out the irony on this one. But indeed, the ANC’s Zweli Mkhize has urged South African Students Congress (SASCO) to steer clear of chasing money for political gain.

Mkhize is readying his bid to succeed Jacob Zuma as party president. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma was once JZ’s preferred candidate, but he’s reportedly ready to ditch her in favour of the man with the momentum.

Zweli Mkhize calls out ANC corruption

By many, the Treasurer-General is seen as the sanest mind inside the ANC asylum. He’s been touted as a ‘centrist’ candidate, and has not been afraid to condemn state capture and party corruption.

He passed this message on to SASCO members. Addressing an audience at Nelson Mandela University, PE, he acknowledged some ANC MP’s had been easily lead astray. He wants these potential future politicians to set the example:

“You have the responsibility to prove that we have turned our backs on that culture and the ANC must do the same. The future of the movement is at risk because there is a perception that we are tolerant of corruption,”

“It is only a few who are accused. It is up to the rest who are not corrupt, who must rise up so that people can see that the corrupt are the exception, not the norm.”

Mkhize asks students to create jobs

Bamanye Matiwane is SASCO’s chairperson for their western region. Matiwane stated that the group would be pushing for all students to receive free education. They are also suggessting National Student Financial Aid Scheme recipients receive free laptop and electricity if they are living off campus.

Mkhize finished his address by asking the students what jobs they can create. He cited figures which indicated 50% of the jobs being trained for today ‘won’t be around in 20 years’.

His calls for students to avoid corruption may have been well-intentioned. But perhaps he should be saying these things in Parliament, rather than just on the campaign trail?

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