What you need to know about Tuesday’s SC special election


Voters in South Carolina’s 5th District will decide Tuesday who will represent them in Congress – and, just maybe, whether or not President Donald Trump gets a clean bill of political health.

The special election in the district — which includes part or all of Fairfield, Kershaw, Newberry and Sumter counties in the Midlands — has played out against a backdrop of tighter-than-expected races elsewhere in the country. Elections in Republican-leaning congressional districts in Kansas and Montana have seen the winning GOP candidate’s margin of victory cut in half from previous contests, raising the question of whether Republican support is eroding in the age of Trump.

Another closely watched congressional election will be held Tuesday in Georgia.

Here’s what you need to know:

5 choices on the ballot

▪ Ralph Norman, the GOP nominee and favorite, is a Rock Hill real estate developer and former member of the S.C. House, who unsuccessfully ran for the congressional seat in 2006.

▪ Archie Parnell, the Democratic nominee, is a Sumter native seeking his first elected office after working for years as a financial adviser for Goldman Sachs in Europe and Asia.

▪ Three other candidates also will appear on the ballot: the Libertarian Party’s Victor Kocher, the Green Party’s David Kulma and the American Party’s Josh Thornton.

The winner will replace Mick Mulvaney, who had represented the 5th District since 2011. The Indian Land Republican resigned to become President Trump’s budget director.

Polls open from 7 to 7

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. In order to vote, you must have registered by May 21.

You may need a state ID

State law requires voters to show one of five forms of photo ID: a S.C. driver’s license, a state-issued ID, a U.S. passport, a military ID, or a voter registration card with a photo. However, would-be voters who can cite some impediment that prevented them from getting a photo ID also can vote.

11 counties in district

The district covers all of Cherokee, Chester, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, Union and York counties, as well as parts of Newberry, Spartanburg and Sumter counties.

Source